" He demeanor was calm as he sat cross-legged with palms resting gently on top of his knees."


This old man was known to the town's people as "The old man selling tea at the old temple." He dressed in dark blue cotton clothing. He wore loosely fitted trousers with the pant legs tied firmly around his ankles. He wore brown socks with black slippers. His loosely fitted jacket had a straight row of cloth loops around cloth buttons (what the modern age calls "Frog Buttons") up to his neck. He demeanor was calm as he sat cross-legged with palms resting gently on top of his knees. He sat behind a dilapidated make-shift wooden stand, very much worn by the weather. On top of the stand were many varieties of dried tea leaves in dark and light-colored bamboo woven baskets, which filled the summer breeze with a variety of fragrant aromas.

As the sheriff questioned the old man, his eyes were slightly closed and his head with short cropped hair rested on a relaxed erect posture. He calmly denied having any knowledge of what had happened to the burglar, Chi-Li.

When the sheriff and his men paraded through town proudly with Chi-Li in tow and bound by ropes, words were buzzing through the town that "The old man selling tea at the old temple" possessed great skill in Kung-Fu. From that day on the townspeople, young and old, went to the temple grounds daily hoping to get a glimpse of the old man practicing kung-fu. Some begged and begged to become his disciple and learn from him. However, the old man always denied that he knew anything about martial arts, but was just an ordinary person selling tea to support his life.

continued...